Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 140,000 members worship in 843 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences; two healthcare networks; 100 early childhood, elementary and secondary schools; a liberal arts university; a health sciences college; a dozen community services centers; 5 book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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COVID-19: A MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT DAVE WEIGLEY

We are living through an unprecedented time, and while we are not immune to the impact of the coronavirus, we know that we serve an almighty God who sees, who cares and who is an ever-present help in times of trouble. As we journey this crisis together, we are in contact with the leaders of our conferences and institutions, and we are united in our commitment to do all we can to reduce the spread of the virus and help people in our communities. Please join us in praying for an end to COVID-19, and for the health care givers, first responders and other frontline workers who are working tirelessly to save lives.

At this time, our office remains closed to the public, until further notice. Please reach out to members of our administrative and ministry teams, and we will respond as quickly as possible.

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President Dave Weigley

Story by Elizabeth Anderson

Most child predators don’t lurk in alleys looking for their victims.  A predator is more likely to be a known and trusted figure in the victim’s community.

Some things to look out for in a predator:

1.  Grooming may be prolonged, but not in all cases.  According to the authors of “Safe Churches: Responding to Abuse in the Faith Community,” grooming could be preceded by a series of small tests that inform the abuser how to proceed.

2. An abuser’s intentions usually seem harmless.

3.  Look out for flattering words and making potential victims feel appreciated.

4.  Seemingly innocuous violations are usually followed by larger ones.

5. Seeking alone time to isolate potential victims “from those who can intervene.”

Story by Elizabeth Anderson

Liliana* is a Generation X Seventh-day Adventist who attends church with her three daughters. The way she worships today has been shaped by a series of violations during her tween years. 

"I was molested by an elder at the church," she told the Visitor staff. "My mother trusted [that] when I was in church, I was fine, andI was safe. And that absolutely was not the case."

Praying and Preying
That sense of trust church members tend to place in others can be attractive for good reasons and nefarious ones.

“Predators love church because there’s an auto- matic feeling of trust,” says Erica Jones, Women’s Ministries assistant director for the North American Division (NAD).

Donovan Ross, vicepresidente de la Oficina de Educación de la Unión de Columbia, compartió con los miembros del comité ejecutivo que su equipo ha pospuesto las visitas de acreditación escolar hasta el próximo año y recibió la aprobación para extender las acreditaciones actuales por un año. Ross también señaló que, a pesar del futuro incierto, la mayoría de las conferencias han extendido los contratos de maestros para el próximo año escolar.